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"hysteria" opens in new york and los angeles and today speaking of great englishmen it was shakespeare who wrote my kingdom for a horse. we have a story about one special horse and her unbelievable comeback against really all the odds. that story coming up next. we'll introduce you. you're watching "cbs this morning." omeback against all odds. you're watching "cbs this morning." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
at architecture in new york city from the light 19th and early 20th century. this 90 minute program took place at cooper union in new york city. >> how do you do? i am barry lewis and we're starting the second semester of a city transformed and the two semesters take us on a trip through new york's history through its architecture and city planning and the fall we go from colonial days until the 1890s and this spring semester we'll go from the 1890s until today. first we got to make sure we all know what new york is. most of you are new yorkers, so of course we do know, but do we? new york begins basically in the 17th century by 1800, just 60,000 people crammed into the southern point of manhattan island. remember, it was the english that made all of manhattan contiguous with the borders of new york city but it only existed in the lower part of the island and in 1800 with 60,000 people once you got to 14th street you were in up state, new york. now, that changes on the left is a civil war era print and an aerial view of new york and by the civil war era the city expanded to about 60th street a
know it as times square and it is still in the future. at the time that in 1893 when the new york herald built the building park row was the media center of new york and the media center of the united states. there was no hollywood in those days. obviously there were no films. the medium was the newspaper, and they were all on park row. that was the media center of its time and the new york herald had the better idea of breaking away from park row and building a new building in the middle of the theater district. 1890s, herald square and you can see by the signs and basically have the square renamed for the newspaper. that gave the "new york times" the same idea ten years later and they moved up to long acre square and the rest is history. obviously it was renamed times square for the newspaper. the bennetts had mckinley and white design a beautiful palazzo, not a sky scraper so it is conspicuous consumption, all of this expensive real estate and it is a two-story building. they only had enough space for the newspaper offices on the upper floor and the lower floor was the printing
backside been reviewed so adoring we buy 70 men with cottontails and the end. new york in the 1890s had two name brothel districts and no one could walk far at night without running -- being propositioned by a prostitute. one reporter doing the bash estimated each of the prostitutes had four clients a day so in most cases one of every six adult males in new york city visited a prostitute. staggering, right? you have to realize the nightlife of that era was just very different. respectful women simply did not -- there was no alert and get lucky. some nights as many as 200 street walkers walked on 13th street between 3 and fifth avenue taking clients that sleazy hotels registered mr. and mrs. smith. during the trial of a police captain a magazine illustrator was asked what he could see from his studio overlooking 13th and he replied fortification -- fornication three windows at a time. he admitted to staying up late at night looking down. the police captain's lawyer tried to discredit him. is it not offensive to you to see those couples going in and fornicating? the artist replied sometimes o
in 1885. this is next. >> good evening, and welcome to the best museum in new york. .. >> he's been the evening of his 40th birthday teaching me to play blackjack up at foxwoods casino. this first history laid bare him love, sex, and perversity from the ancient etruscans to warren g. harding described in the new york times as one that specializes in the raunchy and perverse and was nearly banned by the georgia state legislature . [laughter] [applause] the second edition was characterized on amazon as a tribute to the subversive contrarian, suppressed and bizarre. the only book that explained, and motion picture using photographs of naked baseball players. more uplifting history, richard publish the pirate coast, a starry account of the u.s. marines nearly miraculous suppression of the pirates and the part hunter, has several biography of another esteemed new yorker which was named one of the five best nonfiction books in 2002 by time magazine. richard combines of his passions and obsession to give us an amusing, and lightning, often enthralling encounter a new york when it was truly
itself like it does today. as for the new york herald building, a beautiful italian renaissance palazzo and a machine for selling newspapers. how is that? what you see as black on the ground floor were huge plate glass windows. inside was the printing plant for the new york herald which was a two-story high printing plant. the lower story is below the ground, and the second story at street level is the upper part of the printing plant. after the theater was over, you would come out of the theater. this was ablaze with electric light. most people went home to glass lighting. you stepped up onto a wonderful veranda terrace and looked through the plate glass windows and watched them printing tomorrow's new york herald. they had turned a gritty industrial process basically into entertainment which is very post industrial, very 21st century. then while you are watching them printing the newspaper, a newspaper kid is running up and shoving the new york herald in your face and telling you to buy it and you better buy it, it is new york, so you buy it. you notice that the building facing herald
of it. so brilliant concourse and really one of the great rooms interior spaces of new york. which brings up the subject that this period gave us some of the grandest interior face spaces of the city, grand central's concourse on the left, the reading room on the right. the great hall on the lower right, and what is now gone, pennsylvania station's waiting room. these great interior spaces really we haven't had them since. if they ever build santiago transit center, if they build it, it will probably be the great interior space really since this era. the art deco gave us corporate spaces. but we never had grand spaces like this after the bozar era. it was an amazing era. but grand central is not just a transportation complex, the entire train yard, that's 42nd street below. vanderbilt avenue is here, lexington is there, we're looking north toward the top, all of that train yard was covered over. william wile gus could never imagine in 1903 by the late 1920s grand central would be the nexus of a new corporate headquarters district t new wall street what they called east 42nd street
transportation complex, a piece of new york being redeveloped in about 20 years, the heart of this development, this concourse, is a neo classical double cube, it's the same proportioning as the banqueting house by jones in london from 1620. you go to london, everyone's lined up for big ben. forget big ben. it's only a clock. a few blocks away the banqueting house. exquisite. nobody is in there. you have the whole place to yourself. it's a beautiful space. it's a double cube. but the neo classical architects felt was the perfect interior proportions for a great room. that is also true, by the way, of grand central's concourse as well. also, the corners which you think are dead space, they are office buildings, and they are connected to each other by glass sidewalks that run through the windows. so years ago before 9/11 everything was left open. you could go up there and open a door and go running back and forth in the windows. it was kind of futuristic. i grew up with captain video. i always felt very captain video-ish. by the way, all that stonework that you think is very fancy french stone,
about that, and this is supposed to be a picture of what is wrong with american politics in new york city in the 1850s. for many, many immigrants the politics is one of the key ways in which they integrate themselves into american life and they do this from the get-go and that is what's going to really make a difference in the way americans begin to conceive of their own identities and of the nation's identity as well. so that's what i want to talk about, the immigrant experience of politics in the 19th century and how that relates and develops over time and produces by the time you get to the early 20th century a pluralist philosophy and explanation of what the united states was like. now, basically just there is a lot of different ways to define and understand pluralism and so just for our purposes of fairly straight forward and basic definition of it is a vision of in this case the united states as a country with many different cultures, many different ethnic groups and there isn't one single american identity that everyone has to subscribe to in every way. another way to think ab
laugh about. ha ha, ha. >> new york mayor mike bloom gave the commencement speech at the university of north carolina, and criticized the state's same-sex marriage ban. nothing makes a governor rethink his ways than criticism from a jewish new yorker. ♪ he's a ♪ a hard working man ♪ and he always says ♪ prayers ♪ yeah the thing about him ♪ don't ever let him ♪ touch your hair ♪ >> eliot: mick jagger with more energy than most 18-year-olds i know and amazing performer. anyway >>(narrator) gavin newsom, lieutenant governor of california, and former mayor of san francisco is on current tv. >>every night on cable news networks everyone's focusing on what's wrong. i want this show to move past that. i love creative people, and with all the vexing problems we have we need creative thinking. >>(narrator) with interviews with notables from silicon valley, hollywood, and beyond. >>at the end of the day this show's simple. it's about ideas. ideas are the best politics. ideas can bring us together. >>(narrator) the gavin newsom show. friday at 11 eastern/8 pacific. only on cu
boost their borrowing and a big rollout for chrysler. ashley morrison is here in new york with that and more. good morning, ashley. >> and good morning to you, danielle. stocks overseas make a recovery. tokyo's nikkei gained a half a percent while hong kong's hang seng lost about a quarter percent. >>> the shock of the french and greek election results wore off by the end of the day on wall street. the dow was down as much as 68 points but finished just 29 points lower. the nasdaq edged into positive territory gaining a little more than a point. >>> the white house is renewing its pressure on republicans to to prevent interest rates on federal student loans from the senate is debating a democratic bill that would freze the rates. republicans agree with keeping the rates at their current level but are opposed to pay for the bill, which will cost about $6 billion. >>> americans are using their credit cards more often. the federal reserve says consumer debt rose in march by more than $21 billion. it was the seventh straight monthly increase and the largest since november of 2
and political dimension of art. the abstract expressionists, centered in new york, escaped to an interior world, where the subject of landscape and the struggle with brushwork and pigment became the goal of painting. for the first time, europe looked to new york. abstract expressionism-- abstract art-- is part of western tradition. it evolves out of it. it's part of it. it remains part of it. it's not oriental. it's not a new tradition. clement greenberg, critic and promoter of the new york school, became their spokesman and a friend of the leading abstract expressionist, jackson pollock. i first met jackson pollock in 1942. came down the sidewalk, and there was lee krasner, whom i'd known of old, and she was with a very respectable-looking gentleman. and, uh...i saw this rather nice-looking guy, and lee said to me, "this fellow's going to be a great painter." i went, "well, ok." what finally hit me in pollock's art was the portable mural he did for the apartment house in which peggy guggenheim lived. that hit me. it was the first time i saw him go all over, repeat this way. i thought that was
.s. embassy. >>> scraping the describes. the new world trade center is now new york city's taeflt building. >> it sends chills up and down your spine when you think about what happened. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. thanks for joining us. i'm michelle miller. one year after osama bin laden was killed by u.s. special forces the issue has become a campaign issue. president obama says the anniversary should be a time of reflection. it's a move that's drawing criticism from mitt romney. meanwhile soon to be declassified documents are revealing new information about al qaeda and its leader. tara mergener has more now from washington. good morning, tara. >> reporter: good morning to you, michelle. a task force is going through the documents which will be avaltable later this week. this is a continuing war over bin laden's death. the u.s. government says osama bin laden's death was a crippling blow to al qaeda that is still being held today. >> they're struggling to attract recruits. al qaeda is losing badly. >> reporter: on the evening of may 1st, the navy s.e.a.l.s launched a. they
the anniversary, romney will be in new york today with former mayor rudy giuliani and a group of firefighters. michelle? >> tara mergener in washington. thank you. >>> for the first time the obama administration is talking openly about the use of drones to hunt down and kill al qaeda targets. speaking in washington yesterday, counterterrorism official john brennan said targeting al qaeda members with lethal force is both legal and ethical. targets are chosen by weighing whether there is a chance of capturing the person against how much a threat he presents. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton is en route to china this morning. there she'll hold high-level strategic and economic talks. they're scheduled to begin on thursday. but a human rights issue that neither side wants to discuss is the elephant in the room. it involves a blind chinese lawyer and civil activist who is apparently holed up in the u.s. embassy. danielle nottingham reports. >> reporter: secretary of state hillary clinton has little to say about chinese human activist chen guangcheng in the hours on before her monday night d
later in the show. >>> first, let's go to the news, live at 5:30 a.m. here at 30 rock in new york city. >>> marking the one-year anniversary of the death of osama bin laden, mitt romney is campaigning today, here in manhattan with former new york city mayor, rudy giuliani. bin laden's death coming about as a major political talking point in the last few days. romney is pushing back against suggestions from the obama campaign that he, mitt romney, would not have gone after bin laden as the president did. >> even jimmy carter would have given that order. >> even jimmy carter would have given that order. meanwhile speaking at news conference with japan's prime minister, president obama reacted to that comment from romney referring the former massachusetts governor's 2000 statement that he quote, wouldn't move heaven and earth, spending billions of dollars just trying to catch one person. the quote from mitt romney. the president addressed critics who say his administration is putting too much emphasis on the anniversary of the death of osama bin laden. >> i hardly think that you've seen a
foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering -- working to offer new ventures and key strategic decisions. we offer expert east tees and tailored solutions for a wide range of businesses. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> it is mayday, mayday. demonstrations across europe in the midst of rising unemployment. >> in france, the far-right leader, marie le pen prepares to declare which candidate she would support in sunday's election. >> a long-awaited report on the phone hacking issue. welcome to bbc world news. also coming up in the program, a blood test to show how likely you are to get breast cancer could be available in 10 years time. >> also, new forms of artistic expression. >> hello. thanks for being with us. that is labor day across much of europe. but there is a lack of labor prompting major rallies in many countries, not least of which is france. critical day in the build-up to the presidential election, and many eyes will be f
actually in place to send coded messages to their operations in canada or even here in new york. american general george washington takes command of the troops at cambridge and, again, on the american side there is nobody in charge of cryptology. now what you do have a situation, where merchants are not totally ignorant of codes and ciphers. when they deal with their factors, their agents in london, they had a tendency to use a very cryptive cipher system to tell her agents what price to sell at and so on, and so if their messages were intercepted, their mail, because in the 18th century you had no privacy in the mail. you put it in the mail it was public information and you could pretty much be assured that somebody was going to read it along the way. now, one of the situations is, you have dr. benjamin church who is the surgeon general of the continental army. he is one of the five leaders of the patriot movement in massachusetts, along with john and samuel adams. john hancock, dr. warren and dr. church. the only problem is, dr. church is a british spy. he's been on the british payroll
. nonot.ediciotisionn c n >>> mire la foirp gs en ciudad de new york hay mÁs mexicanos mi menos puerto prriqueÑos la poblaciÓn de origen mexicano, aumentÓ un 74%. los puertorriqueÑos siguen siendo el mayor grupo pop cional en la ciudad de new york. pero su presencia se redujo en se%. el segundo grupo dominicanos comunidad que aumentÓ. en washington higt. el considere zoom de la poblaciÓn mexicana en el tercer lugar. y en reciente informe sobrepoblaciÓn nacida en el extranjero. >>> y existen unos cuantos estados en el paÍs que por tradiciÓn aspirante presidencial tiene que ganar si quiere llegar a la casa blanca y estÁ la florida existe una regiÓn en particular, porque la comunidad hispana puede hion no la diferencia, ena votaciÓn de noviembre. le llaman el i ford. i edicnoti y ahÍ se desplazÓ lourdes del rÍo. vamos a ver quÉ encontrÓ. >>> el corredor de la i 4 y toma el nombre de su carretera i estatal que conecta el centro de la florida. de tampa a orlando. es una zona vibrante, densamentemente poblada, que sus ojos bien @@puestos. tienen >>> se dieron cuenta que aqu
, women, young people, and gays and lesbians. at a fund-raiser here in new york yesterday hosted by musician ricky martin, the president defended his controversial decision to support same-sex marriage. >> i want everybody treated fairly in this country. we have never gone wrong when we expanded rights and responsibilities to everybody. that doesn't weaken families. that strengthens families. it's the right thing to do. >> so far the president's support of same-sex marriage does not appear to be helping him in the polls. according to a new cbs news/new york times poll says 58% say it has no effect on their vote, while 25% say they are less likely to vote for him. and republican mitt romney now has a three-point lead over the president in the race for the white house. >>> in colorado republicans defeated a civil unions bill. governor john hickenlooper called a special session yesterday hoping to pass a law that would give same-sex couples rights similar to married couples, but republican-controlled house committee voted down the measure. meantime republican ron paul says he's done
in their new york home. >>> and changing population. for the first time in the history of the u.s., nonhispanic white babies are now in the minority. >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for thursday, may 17, 2012. >>> good morning. thanks for joining us. i'm manuel gallegus. we begin with the john edwards trial. closing arguments are expected today. his lawyers suddenly wrapped up their case yesterday. prosecutors spent nearly three weeks trying to prove edwards used campaign money to hide his affair with rielle hunter but his lawyers rested their case after just over two days of testimony. edwards wasn't called to the stand, neither was his daughter or hunter. >> the advantage of not putting john edwards on the stand is it takes away the government's ability to stand up and say, john edwards lied about everything and then he got on the stand and lied to you. >> if convicted edwards could get 30 years behind bars. the case could be in the hands of the jury as early as friday. >>> there's been another kennedy tragedy. an autopsy is scheduled today for mary richardson kennedy. the estranged wife o
up, cash mobs. >>> and from south beach to new york. the first-time rowers going the distance for a good cause. the news at 6 will be right back.  >>> president obama spent part of his week pushing congress over lunch. the president was at the tailor gourmet sandwich shot on the u street corridor on wednesday and sat down for a chat with some small business owners. he wants them to be able to get loans from the small business administration to help start ups. >> it's not going to make up for a bad service or bad product. when you have a great service and great product, and people want to work hard, then action by government and the sba can give them a handout and get them started. >> the president said pushing congress to push a 10% tax credit for new jobs and a 20% tax credit to bring overseas jobs back to the u.s. the house republicans lead the president's current -- believe they're hurting small businesses. >>> the president is not the only one pumps out small businesses. cash mobs are swarming stores, giving mom and pop stores big business and ann
apose. a new york woman is that's the record for world's oldest yoga teacher. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello good morning. jamie dimon faces stock holders for the first time. nbc tracie potts joins us from washington with those details. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. what's going to happen today to jamie dimon when he faces the stock holders in tampa for the first time. some say dimon is unlikely to be booted from the top post at the company because he's, until now, been considered a genius on wall street and investors would be unlikely to navigate this without him. but on the other hand there's a proposal to split the chair and the ceo, the two positions that he now holds. jpmorgan chase has lost about 12% of its value in the last five days but this time president obama said on "the view" at least the taxpayers weren't left holding the bag. >> think about it. this is the best or one of the best managed banks. you could have a bank that isn't as strong, isn't as profitable making those same bets and we might have had to step in and that's exactly why
station. >>> and strike a pose. a new york woman shatters the record for world's oldest yoga a new york woman shatters the record for world's oldest yoga teacher. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. welcome to our viewers across the nation, including the pacific time zone. i'm lynn berry. today we begin with in the hot seat. jamie dimon faces stock holders today for the first time since admitting the bank lost millions of dollars due to risky bets made on his watch, a practice he reportedly encouraged. nbc's tracie potts joins us from washington with those details. good morning. >> good morning. the big question today, can he hold on to his job? some analysts think yes because even though this has been quite a challenge for the company, he's been considered a near genius before now on wall street and investors, some of them analysts say, won't want to go on without him. >> reporter: today, jpmorgan chase ceo jamen dimon faces shareholders for the first time since admitting risky hedging led to a $2 billion loss. >> we're still going to earn a lot of
possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. shell. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america," reporting from washington. i am katty kay. ratko mladic, one of the world's most wanted men goes on trial in the hague. president assad goes on russian tv to defend the syrian president, calling his opponents terrorists. beijing basked in the olympic spotlight four years ago. today, the legacy of those games is controversial. >> china promised the games would transform the lives of ordinary people here. four years on, there are serious doubts as to whether anything has changed at all. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. the man who once held the terrified residents of sarajevo i
is known about the death. >> police in bedford, new york, which is a few hours' drive north of new york city, has said that a body was found at a home belonging to robert f. kennedy, jr. and his former wife mary earlier this afternoon. they have not confirmed reports that it was mary kennedy and they have not confirmed or denied reports that the body was found in an apparent suicide. ap news here in the united states reported that mary kennedy was found hanged. tonight, her family has paid tribute to her in a statement saying that they regret her death -- day regret the death of their beloved sister mary who they say her radiant creative spirit will be missed by those who loved her. she had four children with her former husband robert f. kennedy. so the family is confirming that mary kennedy has been found dead in that house in upstate new york. but not giving any further details as to how she died at this stage. we do know that she suffered with drugs and alcohol problems in the past. there were two incidents, one driving under the influence of alcohol and one driving under the influen
stadium earlier this month in new york city. [ cheers and applause ] >> this is awesome. [ cheers and applause ] there are graduates, families and friends here today from all 50 states and from around the world. i suspect that having this ceremony at yankee stadium may not be so meaningful for the many of you who are not from new york. or the few misguided of you like david brooks who root for the mets. [ applause ] but as you've heard, i grew up in a public housing project in the bronx just a few miles away from the old yankee stadium, the house that babe ruth built. so for me, this event at the new stadium is momentous. [ cheers and applause ] nothing in my childhood hinted to me that i would be in a positionship day to stand on this field and speak to such a large crowd. as a child, i only saw the stadium on television when i watched baseball games next to my dad on the sofa. so it is not hard to understand how delighted i am to be here with you today. in thinking about today, i have experienced many emotions, but five capture the essence of my feelings. humility -- excitement
]. so this next piece actually another one of the beautiful gems that i found in new york in a yiddish archives it's been lost for so many years. i was lucky to perform it in new york for october for a big jewish audience and people fell in love with it. it's a true story and something that still exists now. this means god watches over -- this piece a girlfriend her boyfriend goes to war and she says, i was lucking to be in love for a little while. i had love and everything i could ever want and now he's off at war and i'm alone. and i don't know what will happen after this. will he kill another mother's child. will i have to live with that? god watch over my belove ed and all the mother's sons. [music] [applause] >> so, not sure how much time we have left? keep going. all right. right? all right. so the next few pieces i wanted to tell you about. one is by [inaudible] and the other is by the same composer that did [inaudible] those conductors the father of russian music. know this song is not a song that was a yiddish it was a russian song and translated to yiddish because people lov
on the economy. of course, "the new york times" and a lot of people in washington and new york have been talking about gay marriage so much so that sometimes they don't have time to change lights in the studios. this is why i'm dark right now. >> i was wondering if it was my glasses. >> no, your glasses are very fashionable and chic. the fact is, it comes down to the economy. by nine percentage points in one poll, they trust romney more than obama on the economy. >> this weekend, when asked the question, what is the political impact of the president's same-sex marriage declaration. come november, people are not going to care about this issue. in the new york times poll, 7% care about same-sex marriage. 50% or 60% care about the economy. while mitt romney is viewed as the one who can, you know, lead the country better to a better economic future -- >> right. >> -- i think two out of three people say the economy is getting better similar to the result in the new york times poll. if you are the incumbent, you want people to feel the economy is better. romney is closing the gap. >> he has. let's go
and limits the choices parents have. >> host: if you're not from new york on attacking the harlem in westchester this woman can't even knock u.s. fill in the blanks. >> guest: shura, which you find is that the public education system is offering their easter manically from district to district. and many studies have been done that showed that unfortunately democrats tax and the zip code your friend in this country determines your testimony and that is exhibited in many ways, but especially in educational outcome. if you are friends and affluent like westchester oran from 30 minutes away from heartland, we have access to a much better public education system than the kids do in harlem and that is really what i was interested in. i think that difference is -- i think it is morally wrong. i think this is the civil rights issue of today and it's not just about race. it's about class and the risks that the search of mondays. i mean, i can end up going to college in choosing if i want to be a doctor or a struggling homemaker and kids in harlem are going to have the choice to switch. we
and the united states of america laugh about. ha, ha ha. >> new york mayor mike bloom gave the commencement speech at the university of north carolina, and criticized the state's same-sex marriage ban. nothing makes a governor rethink his ways than criticism from a jewish new yorker. ♪ he's a ♪ a hard working man ♪ and he always says ♪ prayers ♪ yeah, the thing about him ♪ don't ever let him ♪ touch your hair ♪ >> eliot: mick jagger with more energy than most 18-year-olds i know, and amazing performer. anyway dimon meet rough. pressure builds for the head of jp morgan to step down. next on "viewpoint." >>scores of the most talented filmmakers in the world gather in new york city every year for the tribeca film festival. the eclectic slate of films draws an estimated 3 million people a year. cat coira's film, "while we were here," is about how travel can change the way we look at our lives and loves. >>you never know someone until you travel with them, because it takes people out of their element. >>(narrator) director morgan spurlock's films have taken him all around the wor
. mostly 70s from the dakotas to indianapolis. 80s in dallas and baltimore. 71 here in new york. >> well, film buffs know that zombie movies are rarely set in big cities. here in new york they probably -- >> yeah, that's right but the town of brownsville, oregon is right out of zombie casting central. a filmmaker is taking full advantage using almost the entire population of just 1,630 people to help behind the scenes as well as dressing up for the cameras in their goriest zombie best. >> hoping to take it to the big screen someday. young spielberg on his way. >>> coming up, the man with the burnout. >> and revving up the new orleans economy by attracting some of the nation's brightest minds. stay tuned for my special report. >> you're watching "world news now." let me tell you about a very important phone call i made. when i got my medicare card, i realized i needed an aarp... medicare supplement nsurance card, too. medicare is one of the great things about turning 65, but it doesn't cover everything. in fact, it only pays up to " 80% of your part b expenses. if you're already on or eli
foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering working to nurture new ventures and provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailor solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now, bbc world news >> -- "bbc world news america." >> reporting from washington, on the eve of historic elections in egypt, we are on the grounds to hear what voters want from their next leader. >> what do you want from your president? what is most important? >> i need one that has a vision. >> sold into the sex trade. there is a trafficking route from mexico to the u.s. >> the launch of the spacex falcon 9 roscket >> blast off at for the first commercial flight into space. this ushers in a private era of enterprise. welcome to our viewers on pbs and around the globe. it only takes a quick look into the history books to see why egypt is buzzing with excitement. for the first time in more than 5000 years, the country has a chance to
. >> reporter: john miller, cbs news, new york. >>> the parents of an american soldier captured in afghanistan say there have been secret faempts to free their season. bowe bergdahl was captured in 2009. his parents say there have been attempts to swap their son for taliban prisoners held by the u.s. but the deal has been stalled for months and they are frustrated. >>> coming on the morning news -- storming ashore. a tornado is captured on video in louisiana as it tears up homes during some frightening moments. ♪ [ upbeat ] [ barks ] [ announcer ] all work and no play... will make allie miss her favorite part of the day. [ laughing ] that's why there's new beneful baked delights. from crispy crackers to shortbread cookie dog snacks, they're oven-baked to surprise and delight. beneful baked delights: a unique collection of four new snacks... to help spark play in your day. [ female announcer ] new aveeno skin strengthening body cream helps transform dry, thinning skin, by strengthening its moisture barrier, for improved texture and elasticity in 2 weeks. reveal healthy, supple skin. aveeno sk
. >>> hacemos una pausa al volver, diremos como cambia la poblaciÓn latina en new york. >>> y ademÁs enrique, vamos a visitar una regiÓn de la florida los votos hispanos tienen un significado muy especial. >>> y una organizaciÓn educativa revive esperanzas para profesional latinos que no rercen las carreras quempactoÍe @@ionen. er impfacebo extra runivision@@s @@ndremoprimeÁs acto eante e r @ er imp extra runivision@@primerr a r a florida existe una regiÓn en particular, porque la comunidad hispana puedprimer hacer la diferencia,r y ahÍ se desplazÓ lourdes del rÍo. vamos a ver quÉ encontrÓ. >>> el corredor de la i 4 y toma el nombre de su carretera i estatal que conecta el centro de la florida. de tampa a orlando. es una zona vibrante, densamentemente poblada, que sus ojos bien puestos. os tienen >>> se dieron cuenta que aquÍ en esta zona, hay mucho independiente. y es un voto que decide las elecciÓn. ivision@@primer impacn los 29 votos electorales de lapn florida. >>> el interÉs de los aplico ion@@primer impacto extra runiÔv nÚprimros dempactomentera rivisr 57% xtra r reacto
to the international space station. >>> and strike a pose. a new york woman shatters the record for world's oldest yoga teacher. good morning, everyone. i'm lynn berry. those stories and more are straight ahead had. this is "first look" on msnbc. >>> and we're going to it begin this morning with "in the hot seat." jamie dimon faces stack holders today for the first time since admitting jpmorgan chase lost billions. nbc's tracie potts joins us from washington with the details on this. good morning. >> reporter: lynn, some analysts are saying that dimon is unlikely to lose his job because, despite what's going on with the company right now, he's been considered a near-genius on wall street and many investors won't want to navigate this without him. today jpmorgan chase ceo jamie dimon faces shareholders for the fist time since admitting risky hedging led to a $2 billion loss. >> we're still going to earn a lot of money this quarter. it isn't like the company is jeopardized. >> reporter: but his job could be. on the agenda, whether to split the company's chair and ceo. right now dimon holds both. elizabet
here in new york city on his way to school, a man told nypd investigators that he's the one who killed the boy. he knows what happened, and tonight, just a short time ago, ray kelly, the chief of the nypd announced the arrest and said they have a signed confession. nbc's ron allen is in the neighborhood where etan patz vanished all those years ago. ron, good evening. >> good evening to you, brian. it's an absolutely stunning and incredible development for this neighborhood, for this community. exactly 33 years ago tomorrow when etan disappeared from these very streets, and we may have finally -- police may have finally solved this 33-year-old murder mystery. three decades after 6-year-old etan patz disappeared while walking two blocks to catch a school bus, the trail has led new york police to this new jersey neighborhood where pedro hernandez lives. police sources say hernandez, 51, said he lured etan with candy into the store he worked in back then, killed the boy, and disposed of the body. >> this evening, the new york city police department is announcing the arrest of pedro hernand
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